Interview about Domestic Violence with Dep.Min of Justice

Transcript copy of Deputy Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development Andries Carl Nel’s interview about domestic violence

(as seen on eNews Channel Africa (eNCA), Thursday 21 February 2013)

Ayanda-Allie Paine (eNCA News Anchor): let’s turn our attention to this now for a moment. The portfolio Committee on Police is calling the amendment for the Domestic Violent Act. The recent increase of domestic violence case has prompted the call to also re-evaluate the Impact the legislation has had on the fight against women and child abuse. The Chairperson of Parliament’s police committee, Annelize van Wyk says the Act doesn’t adequately protect women. Let’s get a reaction from the Deputy Justice Minister, Andries Nel. A very good morning to you and thank you so much for your time.

Question: Does a piece of legislation as it stands suits or benefit women?

Deputy Minister Andries Nel: Very definitely, I think the Domestic Violence Act is one of the best and most progressive pieces of legislation in the world and I think at the time it was adopted, it was absolutely groundbreaking in the provision that it had on the protection of women and also the fact that it was one of the few pieces of legislation in the world that recognize same sex of couples as domestic partners for the purpose of that Act.

Ayanda-Allie Paine: Deputy Minister, if I may interject there. Why the need to make amendments? What are these amendments you seek to make?

Deputy Minister Andries Nel: I think the legislation is basically sound. However, there are number of provision within the Act that have cause complication in terms of implementation. We have asked the South African Law Reform Commission to look at the legislation, to look at where it can be improved and especially, to look at those provision that have run into serious-serious implementation problems to be reviewed.

Ayanda-Allie Paine: The South African Judicial System is under scrutiny not just with the case of Oscar Pistorious but also in previous judgment made against high profile public figures. In your opinion, do you think that our Judiciary is lacking?

Deputy Minister Andries Nel: I think our judiciary and our Criminal Justice System is a very-very sound system. Our Criminal Justice System has succeeded in less than 20 years, to bring down the murder rate in this country from 32000 to 16000 murders. Many other levels of serious crime have come down. That is because, as crime Justice System, we have reviewed that system; we are implementing the plan to bring together Police, the Prosecution, Courts, the present Legal Aid, and Social Development into very-very tight and effective system. I think we’ve seen that during big event such as the World Cup and we have seen that in a number of other instances. Are there problems? Yes, there are problems. Are there serious problems? Yes, there are serious problems. Do we have plans to address those? Yes, we do. Are we addressing those? Yes, we are.

Ayanda-Allie Paine: One of those problems you might be talking about is the issue of Secondary Victimization, many abused women or rape victims saying that they don’t want to take their cases to court because is just not properly handled in the Judicial System?

Deputy Minister Andries Nel: Well, absolutely, one of the reason why the Minister of Justice announced that we will be re-introducing Sexual Offences Courts. Those courts will focus on sexual offences, they will have judicial officers that are experienced in those matter and they will have Prosecutors and support staff in those court as well as facilities such as Videos, Testifying Facilities such as separate Waiting Facilities for victims and witnesses that will minimize that Secondary Victimization. In addition to that, we have a system of Thuthuzela Care Centres, 51 in total, 32 of which are fully operational and we have to bring up to 45 during this year, where a victim of sexual offences can go and receive one stop support, for medical personnel, for Counselors, for other Social services to make sure that he or she is not shuttled through the Criminal Justice System and subjected to that Secondary Victimization. These centres has being very-very successful and in fact they represent the International base practice they are being implemented incorporated in many other parts of the world and even being called Thuthuzela Care Centre in those countries.

Ayanda-Allie Paine: Deputy Minister if I may cut in there quickly, my apology for ……….

Deputy Minister Andries Nel: if can just quickly say, the Thuthuzela Care Centre, since the previous financial year to this year the number of victims who have come those centres has risen from 20000 to 28000. I think that is an indication that people do have confidence in our Criminal Justice System. Yes, they are problems. Yes, we are attending to those.

Ayanda-Allie Paine: Will have to leave it there for now, thank you so much for your time, Deputy Justice Minister Andries. Thank you again.

Inquiry into ‘Marikana Massacre’ opens in South Africa

A retired judge toured the spot where South African police killed 34 striking miners in August as he opened a judicial inquiry into the incident. Street Law Director Prof Steve Naidoo is part of the forensic investigation.

The hearing is being heard in the platinum belt city of Rustenburg, 120km northwest of Johannesburg, the town closest to the Lonmin-owned Marikana mine.

Ian Farlam has four months to uncover the events surrounding the 16 August “Marikana massacre”.

The incident sparked intense criticism not only of the police but also of mining bosses, unions, the ruling African National Congress and President Jacob Zuma.

The names of the 34 dead, most of them from the poor Eastern Cape province, were read out at the start of the inquiry before lawyers for the police, victims’ families and 270 miners arrested after the shootings locked horns over procedure.

The commission and its findings could be politically damaging to Mr Zuma and the ANC, especially if security forces are found to have been as trigger-happy and ruthless as their apartheid predecessors.

However, the inquiry’s four-month timetable means its final findings will come after an internal ANC leadership election in mid-December.

Mr Zuma is expected to be re-elected head of the ANC in the vote – teeing him up to win a second five-year term as South African president in 2014 – although he may face a serious challenge from Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe.

As well as probing the 16 August shootings, the Marikana commission has a broader remit to look into labour relations, pay and accommodation in South Africa’s mines – issues seen as behind the wildcat strike that preceded the killings.